Twenty-one York students take advantage of all that Tuscany has to offer

A montage of images from the Italian Studies course in Italy. These images show students viewing various sculptures.

A montage of images from the Italian Studies course in Italy. These images show students visiting various sculptures and sites around Florence.

Guided by York University Professor Roberta Iannacito-Provenzano, who is chair of the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies (LAPS), 21 students from across the University are experiencing the trip of a lifetime in Italy this summer.

The group is in Florence, Italy as part of a special Summer Studies Abroad Program offered by LAPS. They are in Florence to learn about the city’s contribution to the arts, literature and culture in the context of the social and political transformations taking place during the Renaissance and just before.

As part of their trip, the students are touring museums, galleries and churches to view works by Michelangelo (di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni), Leonardo (da Vinci), Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi) and Giotto (di Bondone) all the while living a few steps from the Ponte Vecchio.

The students at the Bargello Museum

The students visit the National Museum of the Bargello in Florence, Italy

“The excursions to Fiesole to see the ruins and other nearby cities were amazing and they allowed us to take in all that Tuscany had to offer,” said one third-year student. While another student praised Iannacito-Provenzano’s culinary expertise, “The cooking class organized by Prof. Iannacito-Provenzano was fantastic and a must do for future years!”

The program receives funding from LAPS and is among a number of programs that provide York University students with an opportunity to study abroad. The Italian Studies Summer Study Abroad course allows students not only to study the rich heritage of the bel paese, but also to enrich their personal growth as they immerse in a new culture and in a new way of life.

What would Italy be without the luxury of Italian cooking. In this montage, students learn the fine art of making pizza.

What would Italy be without the luxury of Italian cooking. In this montage, students learn the fine art of making pizza.

“I was in awe seeing Botticelli’s Primavera and the Birth of Venus up close and personal.  It was the best experience ever,” said a third-year visual arts student.

“The trip out to the Tuscan countryside to visit olive groves, vineyards and the terrific lunch at the Fattoria San Quintino made my trip,” said another student. .

To view the daily activities of the group, follow @ItalianLingProf on Twitter.

For more information on the course, visit the Italian Studies website.

For more York University news, photos and videos, visit the YFile homepage