Save the date: Sept. 28 panel explores the intersection of disability with the arts

A drone image of Vari Hall on the Keele campus

This panel is the third in York University’s acclaimed series titled “Insights: A speaker series on Equity, Diversity and Inclusion,” organized by the President’s Advisory Council on Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) and hosted by Professor Sheila Cote-Meek, York University’s vice-president of equity, people and culture.

Four scholars from critical disability studies, visual arts, and cinema and media arts will participate in a dynamic panel discussion exploring the intersection of disability with the arts, taking place Sept. 28 starting at 12 p.m.

Created to inspire University community members to take action, provoke thought and conversation about issues related to equity, diversity and inclusion, the Sept. 28 panellists will share their success stories and lessons learned from their research and experiences. This event is free and will be presented using Zoom webinar technology. All are welcome; however, registration is required and can be completed online by visiting yorku.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_IvLCsGvAQYeIto7qW22jBw.

The panel will be moderated by Jenifer Papararo, director and curator of the Art Gallery of York University. Participating in the panel from York University are Mary Bunch, assistant professor of cinema and media arts in the School of the Arts, Media, Performance & Design (AMPD), and Rachel da Silveira Gorman, associate professor and graduate program director of the Critical Disabilities Studies program in the School of Health Policy and Management in the Faculty of Health. Joining them on the panel will be Eliza Chandler, assistant professor in the School of Disability Studies at Ryerson University, and York PhD candidate Syrus Marcus Ware, who is an assistant professor in the School of the Arts at McMaster University.

Meet the panel participants

Jenifer Papararo
Jenifer Papararo

Jenifer Papararo (moderator) joined York University from the Plug In Institute of Contemporary Art on the campus of the University of Winnipeg, where she has held the position of executive director for the past five years. At Plug In, she provided leadership for its mandate of research and education, fostering new artistic works, expanding audiences and conducting strategic planning. Her initiatives include the STAGES biennial, a public art exhibition throughout Winnipeg; the Interpreting Youth program; and several other community-based lectures, screenings and performances. Prior to her appointment at Plug In, she served as curator of the Contemporary Art Gallery in Vancouver from 2004 to 2014. She has been engaged in the contemporary art field in a range of roles for more than 15 years as a curator, writer, institutional director, and member of the service-oriented curatorial and artist collective Instant Coffee. Throughout her positions, she has undertaken production and distribution of contemporary art, partnership building, publishing, and promotion of interdisciplinary approaches and interactions. Papararo holds a master’s degree in art history from Western University. She is a frequent presenter and moderator for a variety of audiences in and beyond universities, and has published several exhibition-related catalogues, an anthology of collected writing and two artist book works.

Mary Bunch
Mary Bunch


A Tier II Canada Research Chair in Vision, Disability and the Arts, as well as an assistant professor in cinema and media arts in AMPD, Mary Bunch is also affiliated with theatre studies and Vision: Science to Applications (VISTA) at York University. Bunch’s teaching and research interests include interdisciplinary and collaborative critical disability, feminist and queer studies, critical theory and research creation. She works at the intersection of the political imagination and its visual/sensory expressions. Her current project on ecstatic freedom engages theoretical, activist and arts epistemologies as these re-envision the forms that democratic participation, political belonging and justice take. She has published articles in the Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies; Feminist Theory; Culture, Theory and Critique; and the Canadian Journal of Human Rights. Bunch has taught at McGill University, the University of Toronto and Western University. She holds a PhD in theory and criticism from Western University.

Rachel da Silveira Gorman
Rachel da Silveira Gorman


Rachel da Silveira Gorman is an associate professor and the graduate program director in the Critical Disability Studies program at York University, and an artist working in dance theatre, performance and curating. Da Silveira Gorman’s research engages theory and method from fine arts, humanities and sciences. Her writing has appeared in Auto|Biography Studies, American Quarterly, Somatechnics, thirdspace, and the Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies. Da Silveira Gorman has created and choreographed 14 dance-theatre and site-specific productions, 10 of which have been remounted or screened at festivals. Since 2009, she has been on the curatorial committee at A Space Gallery in Toronto, where she has curated four exhibitions. In 2017, she received a grant from the Canada Council for the Arts for a performance-based research-creation project called “Year Five of the Revolution.” She spent the 1990s working in social services and as a feminist and union organizer, and the aughties in anti-occupation organizing and in disability and queer arts scenes.

Eliza Chandler
Eliza Chandler


Earning her PhD in social justice and education from the University of Toronto in 2014, Eliza Chandler leads a research program that centres disability arts. This research interest came into focus when, from 2014 to 2016, she was the artistic director of Tangled Art + Disability, an organization in Toronto dedicated to showcasing disability arts and advancing accessible curatorial practice. Chandler is currently an assistant professor in the School of Disability Studies at Ryerson University, where she teaches and researches in the areas of disability arts, critical access studies, social movements and crip necropolitics. Chandler participates in a number of research projects, including co-directing “Bodies in Translation: Activist Art, Technology, and Access to Life,” a partnership project funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), and leading the SSHRC-funded insight development project “Accessing the Arts: Centring Disability Politics in Critical Access Design.” Chandler regularly gives lectures on disability arts, accessible curatorial practices and disability politics in Canada. She is also a member of the Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists.

Syrus Marcus Ware
Syrus Marcus Ware


Syrus Marcus Ware is a Vanier Scholar, a visual artist, community activist, researcher, youth advocate and educator. For 12 years, he was the co-ordinator of the Art Gallery of Ontario Youth Program. Ware is currently a facilitator/designer for the Cultural Leaders Lab (Toronto Arts Council and the Banff Centre). He was the inaugural artist-in-residence for Daniels Spectrum (2016-17) and is also a core team member of Black Lives Matter Toronto. As a visual artist, Ware works within the mediums of painting, installation and performance to challenge systemic oppression. His work explores the spaces between and around identities, acting as provocations to our understandings of gender, sexuality and race, and has been exhibited at the Toronto Biennial of Art (2019), the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Art Gallery of Windsor, the University of Lethbridge Art Gallery, the Art Gallery of York University, the Gladstone Hotel, ASpace Gallery, Harbourfront Centre, SPIN Gallery and other galleries across Canada.  His work has been reproduced in FUSE Magazine, the Globe and Mail, THIS Magazine, and Blackness and Sexualities, among others. His work has also been included in several academic journals, including Small Axe (Duke University), and Women and Environment International. Ware holds degrees in art history and visual studies, and a master’s in sociology and equity studies from the University of Toronto. He is a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Environmental and Urban Change at York University.

Aaron Dhir

Osgoode Professor Aaron Dhir
Aaron Dhir

Osgoode Professor Aaron Dhir’s work on boardroom diversity spurs Globe and Mail investigation of corporate explanations for male-dominated boards

Registration is now open for REI fall workshops

University learning

The work of inclusion is ongoing, proactive and profoundly necessary. York University faculty, staff and students are invited to do their part to enhance belonging and equity within the community by participating in the Respect, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (REDI) Workshop Series and Anti-Racism Workshop Series being offered virtually by York’s Centre for Human Rights, Equity and Inclusion (REI) this fall.

Respect, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion (REDI) 2021-22. Register at: https://rights.info.yorku.ca/redipd

Workshops being offered in September include: Lutte Contre la discrimination (Addressing Discrimination – French only) on Sept. 23 from 10:30 a.m. to noon; and Academic Integrity and Universal Design on Sept. 30 at the same time.

October’s offerings include: Requesting and Accessing Accommodations on Oct. 5 from 2 to 3:30 p.m.; Acknowledging and Addressing Racism on Oct. 7 from 10:30 a.m. to noon; and Challenging Unconscious Bias and Microaggressions on Oct. 19 from 1:30 to 3 p.m.

The remaining workshops for the year will run as follows:

  • Racial Inclusion and Employment Equity, Nov. 4, 10:30 a.m. to noon;
  • Intervening on Racism, Nov. 9, 1:30 to 3 p.m.;
  • Creating and Maintaining Positive Space, Nov. 18, 10:30 a.m. to noon; and
  • Addressing and Responding to Sexual Harassment, Dec. 2, 10:30 a.m. to noon.

The REDI Workshop Series covers the basics in human rights, equity and inclusion, and builds a general understanding of these topics in the context of the Ontario Human Rights Code. Through interactive learning, participants are introduced to core concepts to build a more equitable and inclusive culture at York and beyond. After attending at least three of these workshops and an online module, participants will receive a REDI Certificate of Completion.

The workshops will be delivered on Zoom, with materials presented on screen as well as orally. Attendees will be offered several opportunities to participate via annotation, chat, large group discussion and breakout rooms. Automated transcription is provided over Zoom. Participants can indicate any other accessibility requests in their registration form or by contacting REI.

Members of the York community who are looking for a custom, department-specific workshop should consider the REDI and Anti-Racism sessions first, as they offer a helpful foundation for any team interested in engaging in more in-depth work.

For more information and to register for any of the workshops listed above, visit rights.info.yorku.ca/redipd.

An update on the work of the President’s Advisory Council on Equity, Diversity and Inclusion

Keele Campus Fall image of Stong Pond FEATURED for new YFile

La version française suit la version anglaise.

Dear colleagues,

We are excited to share some important updates on the work of the President’s Advisory Council on Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI), and to explain how York community members can support our efforts to make York University a more diverse, inclusive and equitable place for all. 

Chaired by Sheila Cote-Meek, vice-president equity, people and culture, the council was formed in November 2020 with the task of providing advice and counsel on building an institutional EDI strategy for the University. 

Over the past several months, the council has solidified its mandate and structure, and undertaken an environmental scan of the best and most promising EDI practices in post-secondary institutions, including a comprehensive scan of existing practices at York. Several sub-committees have also been formed to explore the experiences of community members as they relate to EDI through an intersectional lens. These sub-committees are currently drafting strategic recommendations based on existing data and knowledge for consideration by the council, and a draft University-wide equity, diversity, and inclusion strategy will be shared for consultation and feedback from York community members before the end of the calendar year. York community members will also have further opportunities to provide feedback on the strategy before it is released. 

Share your ideas with the council

As part of the work to develop the EDI strategy, the council would like to understand what your priorities are as they relate to equity, diversity and inclusion at York. Community members who are interested in sharing their thoughts and ideas can submit their answers to the following question by Oct. 1:

What key priorities should be included in our EDI strategy?

Insights Speaker Series

Last year, the council launched Insights: A Speaker Series on EDI to help inform and inspire community members and encourage open dialogue and critical thinking about EDI issues, strategies and planning. The first two virtual events in the series were held in Winter 2021, with hundreds in attendance.

The council will be hosting the first Insights event of this academic year – a virtual panel discussion about the intersection of disability and the arts – on Tuesday, Sept. 28, and all community members are welcome to attend. Details about the event and registration are available on the Insights website.

We want to thank everyone in the community for their continued efforts to support EDI initiatives across our campuses and in our broader communities. We look forward to continuing to work together to cultivate a diverse campus culture that is equitable and inclusive of all.

Sincerely,  

Rhonda Lenton  
President and Vice-Chancellor

Sheila Cote-Meek 
Vice-President Equity, People and Culture


Mise à jour sur les travaux du Conseil consultatif de la présidente sur l’équité, la diversité et l’inclusion

Chers collègues,

Nous sommes ravies de partager d’importantes mises à jour sur les travaux du Conseil consultatif de la présidente sur l’équité, la diversité et l’inclusion (EDI) et d’expliquer comment les membres de la communauté de York peuvent appuyer nos efforts pour faire de l’Université York un lieu plus diversifié, inclusif et équitable pour tous.  

Présidé par Sheila Cote-Meek, vice-présidente de l’équité, des personnes et de la culture, le Conseil a été formé en novembre 2020. Il a pour mission de fournir des avis et des conseils sur l’élaboration d’une stratégie institutionnelle d’EDI pour l’Université.

Au cours des derniers mois, le Conseil a solidifié son mandat et sa structure et a entrepris une analyse environnementale des pratiques d’EDI les plus prometteuses dans les établissements postsecondaires, qui comprend une étude complète des pratiques actuelles de York. Plusieurs sous-comités ont également été formés pour explorer les expériences des membres de la communauté en matière d’EDI dans une optique intersectionnelle. Ces sous-comités rédigent actuellement des recommandations stratégiques basées sur les données et les connaissances existantes à des fins d’examen par le Conseil. Un projet de stratégie d’équité, de diversité et d’inclusion à l’échelle de l’université sera communiqué aux membres de la communauté de York à des fins de consultation et de rétroaction avant la fin de l’année civile. Les membres auront également d’autres occasions de fournir des commentaires sur la stratégie avant sa diffusion. 

Partagez vos idées avec le Conseil

Dans le cadre des travaux d’élaboration de la stratégie d’EDI, le Conseil aimerait connaître vos priorités en matière d’équité, de diversité et d’inclusion à York. Les membres de la communauté qui le souhaitent peuvent soumettre leurs réponses à la question suivante avant le 1er octobre 2021 :

Quelles priorités clés devraient faire partie de notre stratégie d’EDI?

Série de conférences sur l’EDI

L’année dernière, le Conseil a lancé Insights : A Speaker Series on EDI pour informer et inspirer les membres de la communauté et encourager un dialogue ouvert et une réflexion critique sur les questions, les stratégies et la planification en matière d’EDI. Les deux premiers événements virtuels de la série ont eu lieu à l’hiver 2021 et ont attiré des centaines de participants.

Le Conseil organisera le premier événement Insights de l’année universitaire : cette table ronde virtuelle portera sur l’intersection du handicap et des arts. Elle aura lieu le mardi 28 septembre et tous les membres de la communauté sont invités à y participer. Vous trouverez les détails de l’événement et les modalités d’inscription sur le site Web Insights.

Nous tenons à remercier tous les membres de la communauté pour leurs efforts constants envers les initiatives d’EDI sur nos campus et dans nos communautés élargies. Nous avons hâte de poursuivre notre collaboration afin de créer une culture de campus diversifiée, équitable et inclusive pour tous.

Sincères salutations,  

Rhonda Lenton 
Présidente et vice-chancelière 

Sheila Cote-Meek 
Vice-présidente de l’équité, des personnes et de la culture 

New partnership to advance fight against global financial crime and support equity, diversity and inclusion in STEM

YFile Featured image Lassonde School of Engineering

The funding from Scotiabank provides $980,000 to support critical research into global financial crimes and security. It will be named the Scotiabank Lassonde Financial Crimes Research Initiative.

At a time when financial markets, technologies and products have become more complex and financial crimes are increasing, Canadian universities can play a critical role in addressing the global shortage of trained experts equipped to tackle these crimes – many of which can impact the most vulnerable such as children, newcomers and elderly.

On Sept. 13, York University announced a contribution from Scotiabank that will provide $980,000 to support a variety of initiatives at the Lassonde School of Engineering.

The funding will support research into global financial crimes and computer security, while also providing support for programs that advance equity, diversity and inclusion in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields.

“York University is profoundly grateful to Scotiabank for their generous investment of $980,000 in support of the Lassonde School of Engineering. This contribution reflects the shared commitment of York and Scotiabank to supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion in science, technology, engineering and math fields and to advancing the groundbreaking work of our researchers in the field of financial crime prevention,” said Rhonda L. Lenton, president and vice-chancellor of York University. “In recognition of this substantial investment, the fund that supports critical research in global financial crimes will be named the Scotiabank Lassonde Financial Crimes Research Initiative.”

Top row: From left, Lisa Cole, director of programming K21 Academy; Lassonde School of Engineering Dean Jane Goodyer; and Stuart Davis, executive vice president, Financial Crimes Risk Management, Scotiabank. Middle row: From left, York University President and Vice-Chancellor Rhonda L. Lenton, Lassonde School of Engineering third-year student Deinabo Richard-Koko; Uyen Nguyen, associate professor, Lassonde. Bottom row: From left, Charles Achampong, director, Community Partnerships, Scotiabank; E. Louise Spencer, acting vice-president advancement, York University; Josephine Morgenroth, PhD candidate, Lassonde School of Engineering and Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University.
Top row, from left: Lisa Cole, director of programming K21 Academy; Lassonde School of Engineering Dean Jane Goodyer; and Stuart Davis, executive vice-president, financial crimes risk management, Scotiabank. Middle row, from left: York University President and Vice-Chancellor Rhonda L. Lenton; Lassonde School of Engineering third-year student Deinabo Richard-Koko; Uyen Nguyen, associate professor, Lassonde. Bottom row, from left: Charles Achampong, director, community partnerships, Scotiabank; E. Louise Spencer, acting vice-president advancement, York University; Josephine Morgenroth, PhD candidate, Lassonde School of Engineering and Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University

This innovative research initiative will support the essential work of talented graduate students and advance research areas related to global financial crimes, which include Ponzi schemes, money laundering efforts and cryptocurrency-based crimes, along with other serious areas of crime such as human trafficking, wildlife trafficking, sexual exploitation and drug trafficking. 

“There is a significant shortage of people with the specialized skills and knowledge to do this work,” says Uyen T. Nguyen, associate professor at the Lassonde School of Engineering. “This research program will also prepare students and emerging scholars for jobs. We are also helping to further promote Toronto as a global financial hub, and providing professionals and expert specialists to the industry locally.”

This work has already shown promise in the real world, says Nguyen.

“This initiative with the Lassonde School of Engineering builds on a long history of collaboration between Scotiabank and York University, spanning five decades,” says Stuart Davis, executive vice-president of financial crimes risk management at Scotiabank. “We are thrilled to be working with Lassonde’s students and faculty on leading-edge research to inform techniques used to combat financial crimes risk, while promoting a shared purpose to advance social sustainability goals.”

As part of Scotiabank’s generous investment in activities that advance equity, diversity and inclusion, the Lassonde School of Engineering’s Helen Carswell STEAM Program for Women will also receive support to encourage participation from Grade 10 and 11 students from marginalized neighbourhoods in a unique eight-week program of paid research in the school’s lab, which conducts work related to the United Nations Sustainabile Development Goals. High-school students in the program will work on research projects related to engineering and science under the guidance of undergraduate research assistant mentors, high-school teachers and Lassonde faculty.

As well, Scotiabank will support Lassonde’s Kindergarten to Industry Academy – expanding the K2I Academy to three Greater Toronto Area school boards to further enhance Grade 9 to 12 science and mathematics programs. Lassonde’s K2I Academy is an innovative ecosystem of STEM educators, thought leaders and partners focused on bringing STEM experiences to youth, educators and communities. K2I Academy is working with partners from Kindergarten to industry to dismantle systemic barriers and build sustainable programs that diversify representation in STEM professions.

“These programs are not just about STEM education. It’s social justice work,” says Lisa Cole, director of programming at K2I Academy. “We want to make sure that every student has a chance to explore the subjects before they make a decision about their path of studies. We want them to see the possibilities for their futures and the social impact they can make.”

Deinabo Richard-Koko, a third-year Lassonde student and mentor with the K2I Academy, says the program is unique in that it shows students how to apply their learnings in real time. “Most people say: ‘What does this add to my life? I’m never going to use this again outside the classroom,’ ” says Richard-Koko. “But with the K2I Academy, students can see the real-time application of what they learned. They can actually use it.”

The support from Scotiabank is already having a huge impact on Lassonde’s programs.

“This funding allowed us to make critical enhancements. We were able to purchase materials and resources, like small electronic devices for engineering learning, to help engage students in hands-on learning,” says Cole. “Without this gift, we wouldn’t have the creative space that we need to innovate and develop outreach materials for our students.”

The goal of these initiatives is to remove systemic barriers to access for underrepresented students in STEM and increase student achievement and enrolment in the prerequisite courses needed to enter post-secondary studies in engineering.

“At Lassonde, we know how important it is to support students of all backgrounds,” says Jane Goodyer, dean of the Lassonde School of Engineering. “That’s why I am pleased we are collaborating with Scotiabank through a shared sense of purpose, determined to equip every student with the skills and values needed to succeed in STEM fields as they work toward a better future.”

Religious Accommodation Guidelines for the 2021-22 academic year

Vari Hall Sunny Day with fountain in foreground FEATURED image

The following is a message to the University community from Provost and Vice-President Academic Lisa Philipps and Vice-President Equity, People & Culture Sheila Cote-Meek:

La version française suit la version anglaise.

Dear colleagues,

Academic accommodation for Students’ Religious Observances (Policy, Guidelines and Procedures) can be found at the York Secretariat Policies website.

The policy addresses York’s commitment to sustaining an inclusive, equitable community in which all members are treated with respect and dignity and outlines the following guidelines/principles:

Guidelines/principles

  1. All students are expected to satisfy the essential learning outcomes of courses. Accommodations shall be consistent with, support and preserve the academic integrity of the curriculum and the academic standards of courses and programs.
  2. The University provides reasonable and appropriate accommodation for students whose religion or spiritual beliefs requires them to be absent from the University for the observance of recognized religious days of significance.
  3. A list of Commonly Observed Dates of Religious Significance are compiled concurrently with the establishment of the Sessional Dates for the upcoming academic year and disseminated to assist instructors in course planning.
  4. Normally the form of accommodation will be alternative dates for final examinations, and adjustment of dates for term work, mid-term examinations or other course components.
  5. The Registrar’s Office takes into consideration the dates of religious significance in its establishment of the final examination schedule.
  6. Documentation from faith leaders is not required to support requests for accommodation.

To assist you, we provide the following list of Commonly Observed Dates of Religious Significance. It is meant as a guide to religious accommodations. This is not a comprehensive list of all holy days of observance and the absence of other dates on this list should not be interpreted to mean that accommodation will not be provided to students who observe the additional holy days associated with their faith or spiritual beliefs.

The guide has been compiled in consultation with York’s student Interfaith Council to ensure it is inclusive for York’s student body. You can also consult the Interfaith Calendar (not maintained by York).

Event planners and faculty members are encouraged to take these days into consideration when scheduling events.

Additional information for students, faculty and staff on religious accommodation can be found on the Centre for Human Rights, Equity and Inclusion website.

You can also read more information on statutory dates in the academic year.

Sincerely,

Lisa Philipps 
Provost & Vice-President Academic   

Sheila Cote-Meek
Vice President Equity, People & Culture


Directives pour les adaptations religieuses : Année universitaire 2021-2022

Chers collègues, chères collègues,

La politique Academic Accommodation for Students’ Religious Observances (Policy, Guidelines and Procedures) relative aux adaptations académiques liées aux pratiques religieuses de la communauté étudiante peut être consultée sur le site Web des Politiques du Secrétariat de l’Université York.

Cette politique reflète l’engagement de York de favoriser une communauté inclusive et équitable dans laquelle tous les membres sont traités avec respect et dignité. Elle énonce les lignes directrices et principes suivants :

Principes et lignes directrices

  1. Il est attendu des étudiants et étudiantes qu’ils et elles satisfassent aux objectifs d’apprentissage essentiels des cours. Les adaptations fournies doivent respecter, appuyer et préserver l’intégrité académique du programme d’études et les normes académiques des cours et des programmes.
  2. L’Université fournit des adaptations raisonnables et appropriées aux étudiants et étudiantes dont la religion ou les croyances spirituelles requièrent qu’ils et elles s’absentent de l’Université pour l’observance de jours religieux reconnus comme étant importants.
  3. Le guide Commonly Observed Dates of Religious Significance est préparé en même temps que les dates de la session à venir et est distribué aux membres du corps enseignant pour les aider à bien planifier leurs cours.
  4. Normalement, ces adaptations consistent en l’ajustement de dates d’examens finaux et de travaux durant la session, d’examens de mi-session ou d’autres éléments du cours.
  5. Le Bureau du registraire prend en compte les dates liées à des pratiques religieuses lors de l’établissement du calendrier des examens finaux.
  6. Aucune documentation de la part de chefs religieux n’est requise pour appuyer ces demandes d’adaptation.

Vous pouvez consulter le guide Commonly Observed Dates of Religious Significance ici. Veuillez noter que ce guide n’est pas une liste exhaustive de tous les jours saints; l’absence de certaines dates sur cette liste ne doit pas être interprétée comme signifiant que des adaptations ne seront pas fournies aux étudiants et étudiantes qui observent d’autres jours saints associés à leur foi ou à leurs croyances spirituelles.

Le guide a été compilé en concertation avec le Conseil interconfessionnel des étudiants de York afin d’assurer son caractère inclusif pour toute la communauté étudiante de York. Vous pouvez également consulter ce calendrier interconfessionnel (non géré par York).

Nous invitons les organisateurs d’événements et les membres du corps professoral à tenir compte de ces dates lors de l’organisation d’événements.

Vous trouverez des informations supplémentaires pour la communauté étudiante, le corps professoral et le personnel relativement aux adaptations religieuses sur le site Web du Centre des droits de la personne, de l’équité et de l’inclusion.

Cette liste de jours fériés publics en 2021-2022 peut également vous être utile.

Sincères salutations,

Lisa Philipps 
Rectrice et vice-présidente aux affaires académiques   

Sheila Cote-Meek 
Vice-présidente de l’équité, des personnes et de la culture

Lassonde EDI fund supports initiatives that reduce barriers and promote equity

Bergeron Centre for Engineering FEATURED image for new YFile format

The Lassonde School of Engineering at York University has introduced a new equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI) funding initiative to promote a culture of EDI at the school while helping to remove systemic barriers for faculty, students and staff in academia.

This initiative, spearheaded by the EDI Sub-Committee and the Lassonde Research Office, supports the development and enhancement of an inclusive culture at Lassonde and beyond. The funding provides community members with many ways to advance equity, diversity and inclusion, from developing new recruitment strategies and funding EDI training to supporting faculty members during parental leaves and life events.

Jane Goodyer
Jane Goodyer

There are two funding categories available as part of the EDI fund. The first aims to improve work-life balance and support faculty members who are new parents, caregivers or going through extraordinary life events. The second category is meant to support initiatives that strive to catalyze change and create a diverse and inclusive environment at Lassonde.

“Different backgrounds and experiences provide a wide range of perspectives which strengthen our educational and research missions aimed towards making a positive impact on a global scale,” said Jane Goodyer, dean of the Lassonde School of Engineering. “By introducing new EDI funding that supports initiatives that promote diversity and inclusion within our community, we can create a cultural change within our school and beyond. Our work can help create systemic change in academia and in the workforce.”

Equity, diversity and inclusion are a key priority for the school, with the EDI Sub-Committee and the Kindergarten to Industry (K2I) Academy acting as key drivers over the past years in implementing initiatives and programs that can create a systemic change within the school and across the education system.

This EDI fund is meant to empower students, faculty and staff to make a difference and pave the way to a more equitable future for all. With this fund, students, faculty and staff have the freedom to design their own initiatives, get creative, and find ways to think outside the box to make the school a more diverse and inclusive space. Community members can also use this funding towards training opportunities to enhance their EDI knowledge and credentials.

For more information about the funding categories and application instructions, visit Lassonde’s EDI Funding webpage.

REI launches REDI Workshop Series and Anti-Racism Workshop Series

To foster effective dialogue and opportunities for learning and engagement, the Centre for Human Rights, Equity and Inclusion will be hosting its annual REDI Workshop Series, as well as the Anti-Racism Workshop Series, beginning Sept. 23 live via Zoom.

REDI Workshop Series

The REDI Workshop Series provides York University community members with eight sessions on a range of human rights topics, exploring key principles and practices that help to uphold rights for all.

Attend at least three REDI workshops (90 minutes each) and complete the REDI© Online Tutorial (it is advised that you complete the online tutorial prior to attending the workshops) to receive a REDI Certificate of Completion. The REDI Workshops all run from 1:30 to 3 p.m. and include:

Requesting and Accessing Accommodations – Sept. 30
Participants receive a detailed overview of the rights and responsibilities in the accommodations process based on the Ontario Human Rights Code, such as those involving disability (including mental health), creed (religion) and sex/gender. In addition to learning how to request and respond to accommodation needs, participants will learn strategies that will assist in increasing inclusion and accessibility in the York community.

Creating and Maintaining Positive Space – Oct. 28
This is a “101” session that will explore gender and sexual diversity, as well as homophobia and transphobia specific to the campus experience. Learn about using inclusive language, being a supportive ally, campus resources and creating safer spaces on campus for gender and sexually diverse students, staff and faculty. In addition to being a component of the REDI© certificate, participants will earn a positive space sticker for display in offices or on personal effects.

Addressing and Responding to Sexual Harassment – Nov. 25
In this interactive session, participants will examine various scenarios aimed at obtaining strategies and sharing best practices on how to identify, prevent and respond to instances of sexual harassment on campus.

Acknowledging and Addressing Racism – Dec. 16
Participants gain an understanding of the impact of racially-based microaggressions and implicit bias, and obtain strategies on how to recognize and address these barriers to inclusive spaces on campus.

Academic Integrity and Universal Design – Jan. 20, 2021
Participants develop an understanding of universal design and academic integrity in an educational environment, and consider the ways universal design can become part of a teaching strategy. Discussion and activities will offer opportunities for participants to obtain strategies for ensuring academic integrity while also providing inclusive learning experiences for all.

Challenging Organizational Structures – Feb. 10, 2020
Participants will examine how organizational cultures can perpetuate systemic disadvantages for individuals and groups, and then consider how engagement can create positive impacts and change within organizational cultures.

Recognizing Resilience in Communities – Feb. 24, 2021
Participants will engage in discussions about community resilience in the face of disadvantage and hardship, examining the ways barriers and discrimination shape our perspective of communities under duress. The workshop will help participants consider how to engage and foster inclusivity across multiple groups and spaces.

Freedom of Speech @ York University – March 10, 2021
This workshop is designed to strengthen participants understanding of fundamental freedom of speech rights in a Canadian context, and will explore current conflicts and resolutions in post-secondary institutions.

Register at https://rights.info.yorku.ca/redipd.

Anti-Racism Workshop Series

The Anti-Racism Workshop Series provides a four-part series on the critical components involved in increasing awareness and actions to address concerns of racial discrimination, and enable us to challenge racism in its’ many forms. If participants have attended at least three workshops, they will receive a REDI certificate of participation. The Anti-Racism Workshops all run from 1:30 to 3 p.m. and include:

Acknowledging and Addressing Racism – Sept. 23
This session will be offered in the REDI series on Dec. 16 as well. Participants are welcome to take it again, however, the content will be the same. This workshop will help participants gain an understanding of the impact of racially-based microaggressions and implicit bias, and obtain strategies on how to recognize and address these barriers to inclusive spaces on campus.

Challenging Unconscious Bias and Microaggressions – Oct. 7
This workshop will take a deep dive into forms of unconscious bias, and stereotyping that lead to microaggressions and discriminatory behaviour, and will explores effective strategies to challenge our biases, reframing our ways of thinking and strengthen the experience of inclusion for all.

Racial Inclusion and Employment Equity – Oct. 21
This workshop focuses on racism and discrimination in the workplace, highlighting the relevant policies and laws in place to support efforts that build healthy and inclusive workplace environments and culture.

Intervening on Racism – Nov. 4
Please note that REI strongly recommends participants to have attended at least one of the workshops above before attending this session. This workshop will be highly participation-based, and ask attendees to design strategies and practice tools to intervene on moments of racial discrimination, harassment and microaggressions. Prior familiarity with these concepts is recommended.

Register at https://rights.info.yorku.ca/understanding-racism-a-guide-for-students-faculty-staff.

All workshops are free and open to any member of the York community. Participants are welcome to sign up for any of the sessions they are interested in, by visiting the REI website at www.yorku.ca/rights.

Centre for Human Rights, Equity and Inclusion offers Anti-Racism Workshop Series

In line with the powerful advocacy and anti-racism work being done by communities across the globe, York University’s Centre for Human Rights, Equity and Inclusion is hosting a four-part series of live online workshops on anti-racism beginning June 23. Sessions are free and open to any member of the York community.

REI Anti-Racism Series

The one-hour training sessions will explore aspects of racism and how racial discrimination operates in our society, and strategies that can be used to challenge this form of discrimination. Participants are welcome to sign up for any of the sessions, which will count towards a REDI certificate.

Session that will be offered include:

June 23, 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. – Acknowledging and Addressing Racism

Please note that this session was offered in the REDI series on June 3. Participants are welcome to take it again, however, the content will be the same.  

This workshop will help participants gain an understanding of the impact of racially-based microaggressions and implicit bias, and obtain strategies on how to recognize and address these barriers to inclusive spaces on campus.

June 30, 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. – Challenging Unconscious Bias and Microaggressions

This workshop will take a deep dive into forms of unconscious bias, and stereotyping that lead to microaggressions and discriminatory behaviour, and will explores effective strategies to challenge our biases, reframing our ways of thinking and strengthen the experience of inclusion for all.

July 6, 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. – Racial Inclusion and Employment Equity

This workshop focuses on racism and discrimination in the workplace, highlighting the relevant policies and laws in place to support efforts that build healthy and inclusive workplace environments and culture.

July 13, 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. – Intervening on Racism

Please note that we strongly recommend participants to have attended at least one of the workshops above before attending this session.

This workshop will be highly participation-based, and ask attendees to design strategies and practice tools to intervene on moments of racial discrimination, harassment, and microaggressions. Prior familiarity with these concepts is recommended.

To sign up for the series, visit https://bit.ly/2zrv5bE; for more information, visit www.yorku.ca/rights.

York faculty, staff and students can earn REDI certificate this summer

The Centre for Human Rights, Equity & Inclusion (REI) at York University is launching its Respect, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (REDI) workshop series for Summer 2020. REDI aims to engage faculty, staff and students in valuable knowledge exchange through a series of educational and professional development opportunities.

REDI workshop

The virtual eight-session series emphasizes the importance of upholding human rights principles throughout campus, while championing equity and inclusion values. With effectively online teaching tools and facilitated dialogue, participants will reflect on policies, relevant experiences and case scenarios that will help them appreciate and apply their learning.

Participants who attend at least three sessions receive a certificate of recognition.

Community members can register and participate in sessions at any time of the year to count towards their certificate of completion in human rights. The full list of sessions is available on the REI website.

Online registration is now open. Spaces are limited and early registration is recommended. Visit rights.info.yorku.ca/redipd to register today.

Each available session is listed below:

  • Thursday, May 21: 2 to 3 p.m. – Creating and Maintaining Positive Space
  • Tuesday, May 26: 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. – Supporting and Responding to Sexual Harassment
  • Wednesday, June 3: 9 to 10 a.m. – Acknowledging and Addressing Racism
  • Thursday, June 11: 2 to 3 p.m. – Understanding and Responding to Accommodations
  • Tuesday, June 16: 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. – Academic Integrity and Universal Design
  • Wednesday, June 24: 9 to 10 a.m. – Freedom of Speech at York University
  • Thursday, July 2: 2 to 3 p.m. – Challenging Organizational Cultures
  • Tuesday, July 7: 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. – Recognizing Community Resilience