Low-income seniors say they’ve been ignored this election. Click here for more York U in the news

Low-income seniors say they’ve been ignored this election
York University Professor Emeritus Pat Armstrong was quoted in CBC News Sept. 19. Read full story.

Newmarket-Aurora advance polling up, but overall turnout may not be
York University Professor Dennis Pilon was quoted on NewmarketToday.ca Sept. 18. Read full story.

Uninterested, unhappy, but not quite ready for change: Why apathy in some Toronto suburbs might let Trudeau keep his job
York University alumnus Iqwinder Gaheer was quoted in the Toronto Star Sept. 18. Read full story.

Simcoe County prepares to hit voting booth
York University Visiting Professor Michael Johns was quoted on CTVNews.ca Sept. 19. Read full story.

The Kenney effect? Alberta premier’s COVID-19 reversal could see O’Toole’s Tories ‘bleed both to the left and right’ in election race, observers say
York University Professor Mark Winfield was quoted in the Toronto Star Sept. 16. Read full story.

‘Tug of War’ is and hopes to be an anti-colonial film: filmmaker Amil Shivji
York University alumnus Amil Shivji was profiled in the Financial Express Sept. 19. Read full story.

Amazon confronts battle with teamsters in labour-friendly Canada
York University Professor David Doorey was quoted in the Regina Leader-Post Sept. 17. Read full story.

‘Bold action on climate change’ needed from new MP: King environmental group Chair
York University Professor Robert Kenedy was quoted on YorkRegion.com Feb. 20. Read full story.

A score to settle: Edmonton software ace looks to upend one of the world’s most entrenched industries
York University PhD candidate Anna Artyushina was quoted in the Globe and Mail Sept. 20. Read full story.

Runnymede Society welcomes Kristopher Kinsinger as national director
Osgoode Hall Law School alumnus Kristopher Kinsinger was profiled in Law Times Sept. 20. Read full story.

Leena Manimekalai’s fight for justice: What happens when men in power get accused of sexual harassment?
York University student Leena Manimekalai was profiled in FeminismInIndia.com Sept. 20. Read full story.

Director’s defamation case adjourned to Oct. 4
York University student Leena Manimekalai was mentioned in the Hindu Sept. 21. Read full story.

Liberals’ Omar Alghabra holds onto Mississauga Centre
York University alumnus Omar Alghabra was mentioned in the Waterloo Region Record Sept. 20. Read full story.

Liberal Ali Ehsassi wins Willowdale riding
Osgoode Hall Law School alumnus Ali Ehsassi was mentioned in the Waterloo Region Record Sept. 20. Read full story.

Liberal incumbent Majid Jowhari wins Richmond Hill
Schulich School of Business alumnus Majid Jowhari was mentioned in the Toronto Star Sept. 21. Read full story.

Brampton non-profit awards 13 Peel students with scholarships to help tuition costs
York University students Pamusa Nafees and Reon Pyne were mentioned in the Mississauga News Sept. 20. Read full story.

Chris Selley: Partisan heroes don’t help in an election held for no reason
York University Professor Emeritus Reg Whitaker was mentioned in the Ottawa Citizen Sept. 19. Read fill story.

TIFF 2021: ‘Tug of War’ film review
York University alumnus Amil Shivji was mentioned on BlackFilm.com Sept. 18. Read full story.

Canada’s economy took a shocking second-quarter dive. Where will it go next?
Schulich School of Business Professor James McKellar was mentioned in the Waterloo Region Record Sept. 18. Read full story.

Theatre pro brings history to life at O’Keefe Ranch
York University alumna Diane Llewelyn-Jones was mentioned in the Vernon Morning Star Sept. 18. Read full story.

Liberal Yvan Baker wins Etobicoke Centre riding
York University’s Schulich School of Business was mentioned in the Peterborough Examiner Sept. 20. Read full story.

Investors more vulnerable amid COVID environment
York University’s Osgoode Hall Law School was mentioned on WealthProfessional.ca Sept. 20. Read full story.

Take hold of a historic opportunity at this new Downsview Park build
York University was mentioned on storeys.com Sept. 20. Read full story.

Editorial: The neglect of international students
York University was mentioned in the Medium Sept. 20. Read full story.

Riding profile: Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas has a wide slate of candidates, from ER nurse to former minister
York University was mentioned in CBC News Sept. 19. Read full story.

Golden Hawks, Warriors open with convincing victories
York University was mentioned in the Waterloo Region Record Sept. 18. Read full story.

Ryerson students can learn about Drake, The Weeknd in new course this year
York University was mentioned in CityNews Sept. 18. Read full story.

‘Your body can only take you so far working in a kitchen’: Why a Toronto pastry chef left restaurants to become a paralegal
York University was mentioned in Toronto Life Sept. 17. Read full story.

Registration is now open for REI fall workshops

University learning

The work of inclusion is ongoing, proactive and profoundly necessary. York University faculty, staff and students are invited to do their part to enhance belonging and equity within the community by participating in the Respect, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (REDI) Workshop Series and Anti-Racism Workshop Series being offered virtually by York’s Centre for Human Rights, Equity and Inclusion (REI) this fall.

Respect, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion (REDI) 2021-22. Register at: https://rights.info.yorku.ca/redipd

Workshops being offered in September include: Lutte Contre la discrimination (Addressing Discrimination – French only) on Sept. 23 from 10:30 a.m. to noon; and Academic Integrity and Universal Design on Sept. 30 at the same time.

October’s offerings include: Requesting and Accessing Accommodations on Oct. 5 from 2 to 3:30 p.m.; Acknowledging and Addressing Racism on Oct. 7 from 10:30 a.m. to noon; and Challenging Unconscious Bias and Microaggressions on Oct. 19 from 1:30 to 3 p.m.

The remaining workshops for the year will run as follows:

  • Racial Inclusion and Employment Equity, Nov. 4, 10:30 a.m. to noon;
  • Intervening on Racism, Nov. 9, 1:30 to 3 p.m.;
  • Creating and Maintaining Positive Space, Nov. 18, 10:30 a.m. to noon; and
  • Addressing and Responding to Sexual Harassment, Dec. 2, 10:30 a.m. to noon.

The REDI Workshop Series covers the basics in human rights, equity and inclusion, and builds a general understanding of these topics in the context of the Ontario Human Rights Code. Through interactive learning, participants are introduced to core concepts to build a more equitable and inclusive culture at York and beyond. After attending at least three of these workshops and an online module, participants will receive a REDI Certificate of Completion.

The workshops will be delivered on Zoom, with materials presented on screen as well as orally. Attendees will be offered several opportunities to participate via annotation, chat, large group discussion and breakout rooms. Automated transcription is provided over Zoom. Participants can indicate any other accessibility requests in their registration form or by contacting REI.

Members of the York community who are looking for a custom, department-specific workshop should consider the REDI and Anti-Racism sessions first, as they offer a helpful foundation for any team interested in engaging in more in-depth work.

For more information and to register for any of the workshops listed above, visit rights.info.yorku.ca/redipd.

Next Scholars’ Hub @ Home event looks at privacy in virtual classrooms

A virtual classroom displayed on an open laptop

For the Sept. 22 edition of the Scholars’ Hub @ Home speaker series, Assistant Professor Yan Shvartzshnaider in the Lassonde School of Engineering’s Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science will host a discussion titled “Privacy in virtual classrooms.”

Headshot of Yan Shvartzshnaider
Yan Shvartzshnaider

Shvartzshnaider will discuss the overall privacy implications of virtual classrooms and present recent work on conducting privacy analysis of remote learning tools that are currently being used at U.S. universities.

Brought to you by York University’s Office of Alumni Engagement, the Scholars’ Hub @ Home speaker series features discussions on a broad range of topics, with engaging lectures from some of York’s best and brightest minds. Students, alumni and all members of the community are invited to attend. All sessions take place at noon via Zoom.

Events are held in partnership with Vaughan Public Libraries, Markham Public Library and Aurora Public Library.

To register for the event, visit bit.ly/3zh9hIv.

Attend virtual launch of EUC Prof. Andil Gosine’s new book

An open book

Professor Andil Gosine of York University’s Faculty of Environmental and Urban Change (EUC) is hosting a virtual launch for his award-winning new book, Nature’s Wild: Love, Sex and Law in the Caribbean (Duke University Press), on Thursday, Sept. 23 at 4 p.m. via Zoom, in conjunction with the Art Gallery of Ontario exhibition Fragments of Epic Memory.

Andil Gosine "Nature's Wild" North America Book Tour Fall 2021. Toronto, September 23 (international day of publication), 4 p.m., register online at ago.ca/events

In Nature’s Wild, the Trinidad-born scholar-artist contends with his own animality. The story begins in his classroom at an all-boys Catholic high school in Trinidad, when a priest points to a row of boys and demands, “Prove to me that you are not homosexual.” From there, Gosine takes readers on a journey that mixes personal narrative with historical analysis of the ways in which anxieties about humans’ animality have produced various kinds of disciplinary strategies in law and culture. Gosine draws from historical and contemporary visual art representations, dress code regulations and recent legal challenges to the criminalization of sodomy, to argue for the embracing of one’s “wild nature.”

Headshot of York University Professor Andil Gosine
Andil Gosine

Gosine is a professor of environmental arts and justice at York University. He is also the curator of the exhibition Everything Slackens in a Wreck, which will open at the Ford Foundation Gallery in New York next spring. The companion touring exhibition for his book Nature’s Wild will launch its three-year tour in Port of Spain, Trinidad, in January 2022.

Joining Gosine at the launch for a discussion about his new book are Richard Fung, Kamala Kempadoo and Jillian Ollivierre. Fung is a Trinidad-born, Toronto-based video artist, cultural critic and community activist, whose seminal and celebrated works include the films Sea in the Blood, My Mother’s Place and Dal Puri Diaspora. Kempadoo is a professor in the Department of Social Science at York University and director of the Graduate Program in Social and Political Thought. She teaches Caribbean studies, transnational feminisms, sex work studies, Black studies, and critical perspectives in gender and development, and is the author of Sexing the Caribbean. Ollivierre is a doctoral candidate in social anthropology at York University. Her interview essay on Gosine’s artistic practice, “After Indo-Caribbean: Interrogating Interstitial Identities and Diasporic Solidarties in Conversation with Andil Gosine,” is forthcoming in the journal Histoire sociale.

To register for this event, visit bit.ly/3tOqQPm. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email including details about how to join the webinar.

Nature’s Wild: Love, Sex and Law in the Caribbean is available for purchase now at Another Story Bookshop.

Cognitive Science Speaker Series returns with the psychology of explanation

Woman explaining something to a child, pointing at computer monitor

On Sept. 22, the Cognitive Science Speaker Series returns with a discussion about the psychology of explanation, titled “Explanation: The Good, the Bad and the Beautiful,” featuring guest speaker Tania Lombrozo, the Arthur W. Marks ’19 Professor of Psychology at Princeton University.

Headshot of Tania Lombrozo
Tania Lombrozo

Like scientists, children and adults are often motivated to explain the world around them, including why people behave in particular ways, why objects have some properties rather than others and why events unfold as they do. Moreover, people have strong and systematic intuitions about what makes something a good (or beautiful) explanation. Why are we so driven to explain? And what accounts for our explanatory preferences? In this talk, Lombrozo will present evidence that both children and adults prefer explanations that are simple and have broad scope, consistent with many accounts of explanation from the philosophy of science. The good news is that a preference for simple and broad explanations can sometimes improve learning and support effective inferences. The bad news is that under some conditions, these preferences can systematically lead children and adults astray.

Lombrozo’s research aims to address basic questions about learning, reasoning, and decision-making using the empirical tools of experimental psychology and the conceptual tools of analytic philosophy. Accordingly, much of her work is informed by the philosophy of science, epistemology and moral philosophy alongside cognitive, social and developmental psychology. Beyond her research on the human drive to explain, she studies intuitive beliefs about causation, moral responsibility and the nature of knowledge.

The Cognitive Science Speaker Series is presented by York University’s Department of Philosophy in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies. All talks take place on Wednesdays from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. via Zoom. Prior to each talk, the Zoom link will be emailed to all students and faculty from the cognitive science and philosophy departments. Those who want to attend but are not in those departments can email Professor Jacob Beck at jbeck@yorku.ca from a York email address to request the Zoom link.

Climate action is at risk because of the snap federal election call. Click here for more York U in the news

An op-ed by York University Professor Mark Winfield was published in the Conversation Sept. 14. Read full story.

Federal election 2021: More supply won’t solve Canada’s housing affordability crisis
An op-ed by York University PhD candidate Joel Roberts was published in the Conversation Sept. 15. Read full story.

Canada’s women’s soccer team is more popular than ever – so where’s the merch?
Schulich School of Business marketing instructor Vijay Setlur was quoted in CBC News Sept. 17. Read full story.

How accessible is voting for people with disabilities?
Osgoode Hall Law School Visiting Professor David Lepofsky was quoted in CBC News Sept. 15. Read full story.

Young NDP candidates cut their teeth in short campaign
York University student Christina Love was quoted in the Toronto Star Sept. 15. Read full story.

SpaceX’s all-civilian Inspiration4 crew readies for launch
York University Professor Kathryn Denning was quoted in Wired Sept. 15. Read full story.

Amazon faces union drive in Canada months after Alabama win
York University Professor David Doorey was quoted in Bloomberg Sept. 14. Read full story.

Leena Manimekalai moves Madras HC challenging order to impound her passport
York University student Leena Manimekalai was profiled in the Wire Sept. 16. Read full story.

Me Too: WCC asks film industry to support Leena Manimekalai who outed Susi Ganesan
York University student Leena Manimekalai was profiled on TheNewsMinute.com Sept. 15. Read full story.

Conservative candidate looking to ‘pay it forward’
York University alumna Leslyn Lewis was profiled in the Simcoe Reformer Sept. 14. Read full story.

COVID-19 created ‘perfect storm of market volatility,’ says director of investor clinic
Osgoode Hall Law School Professor Poonam Puri was quoted in the Lawyer’s Daily Sept. 15. Read full story.

Shulman & Partners lends support to Family Justice Centre
Osgoode Hall Law School alumnus Ron Shulman was quoted in the Lawyer’s Daily Sept. 16. Read full story.

Royal Society of Canada recognizes York University professor
Osgoode Hall Law School Professor Poonam Puri was mentioned in the Lawyer’s Daily Sept. 16. Read full story.

NBA Films for Fans created with OLG: Previewing the five films set to premiere at TIFF 2021
York University alumnus Shawn Gerrard was mentioned on nba.com Sept. 17. Read full story.

Howie, Sacks & Henry hires new associate
Osgoode Hall Law School alumna Pooneh Sooresrafil was mentioned in the Lawyer’s Daily Sept. 14. Read full story.

Jess Dobkin, a performance artist with a unique sense of humour
The Art Gallery of York University was mentioned on hyperallergic.com Sept. 16. Read full story.

Angels care about what you mean, while devils care about what you say
York University was mentioned in Forbes Sept. 15. Read full story.

Newish to Manitoulin: Arthur Ross and Candice Irwin
York University was mentioned in the Manitoulin Expositor Sept. 15. Read full story.

Quebec book industry calls for reform of the Copyright Act
York University was mentioned in Canadian Lawyer Sept. 14. Read full story.

Two new associates for Neinstein Personal Injury Lawyers
York University alumna was mentioned in the Lawyer’s Daily Sept. 14. Read full story.

Match analysis: York United 2-0 Atlético Ottawa
York University was mentioned on canpl.ca Sept. 14. Read full story.

Canadiens hire ex-army trainer Dale Lablans as strength coach
York University was mentioned on DailyHive.com Sept. 14. Read full story.

Alouettes coach Khari Jones isolating after positive COVID-19 test
York University was mentioned in the Regina Leader-Post Sept. 14. Read full story.

Canadian Writers in Person returns with a reading from Michelle Good’s first novel

CWIP FEATURED

If you love meeting talented writers and hearing them read from their published work, or just want to soak up a unique cultural experience, don’t miss the Canadian Writers in Person Lecture Series, which launches its 2021-22 season on Sept. 21.

Five Little Indians book cover shows a birchbark forest with the words Five Little Indians and the author's name Michelle Good

The series gives attendees an opportunity to get up close and personal with 11 authors who will present their work and answer questions. Canadian Writers in Person is a for-credit course for students. It is also a free-admission event for members of the public. All readings take place at 7 p.m. on select Tuesday evenings via Zoom. Links for each reading can be found here.

This year’s lineup consists of a unique selection of emerging and established Canadian writers whose writing explores a broad range of topics and geographical and cultural landscapes. Featuring seasoned and emerging poets and fiction writers, the series highlights Canada’s ever-growing pool of literary talent.

On Sept. 21, author Michelle Good kicks off the 2021-22 series with a reading from her first novel, Five Little Indians (HarperCollins Canada), which won the HarperCollins/UBC Best New Fiction Prize.

Good is a Cree writer and a member of the Red Pheasant Cree Nation in Saskatchewan. After working for Indigenous organizations for 25 years, she obtained a law degree and advocated for residential school survivors for over 14 years. She earned a master of fine arts in creative writing at the University of British Columbia while still practising law and managing her own law firm. Her poems, short stories, and essays have been published in magazines and anthologies across Canada, and her poetry was included on two lists of the best Canadian poetry in 2016 and 2017.

Five Little Indians chronicles the desperate quest of residential school survivors to come to terms with their past and, ultimately, find a way forward. Taken from their families when they are very small and sent to a remote, church-run residential school, Kenny, Lucy, Clara, Howie and Maisie are barely out of childhood when they are finally released after years of detention. Alone and without any skills, support or families, the teens find their way to the seedy and foreign world of downtown eastside Vancouver, where they cling together, striving to find a place of safety and belonging in a world that doesn’t want them. The paths of the five friends cross and criss-cross over the decades as they struggle to overcome, or at least forget, the trauma they endured during their years at the Mission.

Other readings scheduled in this series are:

2022

Canadian Writers in Person is a course offered in the Culture & Expression program in the Department of Humanities in York University’s Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies. For more information on the series, visit yorku.ca/laps/canwrite, or email Professor Gail Vanstone at gailv@yorku.ca or Professor Leslie Sanders at leslie@yorku.ca.

The GTA’s toss-up ridings could tell the story of the election. Click here for more York U in the news

York University Professor Dennis Pilon was quoted in CBC News Sept. 14. Read full story.

Student candidates in federal election balance classes with campaigning
York University student Eric Frydman was quoted in CBC News Sept. 13. Read full story.

Not just student debt: Experts say the youngest voters’ key issues are being ignored
York University PhD student Grace Barakat was quoted on CTVNews.ca Sept. 10. Read full story.

Bring your own pencil: Advance polls open in Simcoe Muskoka with new safety measures
York University visiting Professor Michael Johns was quoted on CTVNews.ca Sept. 10. Read full story.

Why are coups making a comeback in Africa?
An op-ed by York University lecturer Remi Adekoya was published in on cnn.com Sept. 13. Read full story.

Listening to a story helps hospitalized kids heal
York University Professor Raymond Mar was quoted in Scientific American’s October 2021 issue. Read full story.

Cineplex and U.K. exhibitor Cineworld to begin legal battle over scrapped deal
York University Professor Richard Leblanc was quoted in the Peterborough Examiner Sept. 12. Read full story.

This plant medicine teacher is reclaiming Anishinaabe names for species. Why that could be good for the planet
York University Professor Deborah McGregor was quoted on cbc.ca Sept. 12. Read full story.

Here’s how hockey fans watch the puck without watching the puck
York University Professor James Elder was quoted in ABC News Sept. 12. Read full story.

Tillsonburg Hydro Inc. hires new general manager
Schulich School of Business alumnus Ravi Baichan was profiled in the Stratford Beacon Herald Sept. 13. Read full story.

Ran Zhu – your Green candidate for Wellington-Halton Hills
York University alumnus Ran Zhu was profiled on PuslinchToday.ca Sept. 13. Read full story.

Meet Rozina Jaffer: Liberal Party of Canada
Osgoode Hall Law School alumna Rozina Jaffer was interviewed in the New Westminster Record Sept. 10. Read full story.

Allow VAT legal battle run full course, Ekweremadu Advises NASS
York University’s Osgoode Hall Law School was mentioned on TribuneOnlineNG.com Sept. 12. Read full story.

First racialized justice on Court of Appeal for Ontario retires from bench after 23 years
York University’s Osgoode Hall Law School was mentioned in Canadian Lawyer Sept. 10. Read full story.

Chief medical officers of health can’t be all things to all people
York University was mentioned in the Globe and Mail Sept. 13. Read full story.

Investment in building construction drops in July
York University was mentioned on hpacmag.com Sept. 13. Read full story.

Leylah Fernandez is Canada’s latest tennis success story. It was 30 years in the making
York University was mentioned in the Welland Tribune Sept. 11. Read full story.

Pitching in: Diverting used sports equipment from the landfill
York University was mentioned in the Globe and Mail Sept. 10. Read full story.

Toronto urban legend tells of ramp built for tanks to crush student uprisings
York University was mentioned in BlogTO Sept. 9. Read full story.

Celebrate York’s outstanding alumni at the York U Alumni Awards show, Nov. 18

Alumni Awards FEATURED

The York University community is invited to attend the York U Alumni Awards virtual event, an evening of entertainment and celebration to honour the accomplishments of this year’s four Alumni Award recipients and recognize the positive change cultivated by York students and alumni both locally and globally.

Join hosts Shahir Massoud (BBA ’06), author, chef and co-host of CBC’s The Goods, and recent Glendon grad Moboluwajidide “Bo” Joseph (BA ’21), recipient of the Robert J. Tiffin Student Leadership Award and Robert Everett Exceptional Leadership in Student Governance Award, on Nov. 18 at 7 p.m. to celebrate the exceptional Alumni Award winners, performers and guests – all from the comfort of your couch.

2021 York U Alumni Awards
This year’s York U Alumni Award recipients are: Christopher House (pictured, top left); Pamela Ohashi (pictured, top right); Weyni Mengesha (pictured, bottom left); and Earle Nestmann (pictured, bottom right)

This year’s award recipients are Earle Nestmann (MSc ’71, PhD ’74); Christopher House, C.M. (BFA ’79); Pamela Ohashi (BSc Hons. ’82); and Weyni Mengesha (BFA ’05). The event will feature performances by alumna and four-time Juno Award nominee and musician Sarah Slean, the York University Gospel Choir and Vanier College Productions, with guest appearances by celebrity alumni.

This special event will also include remarks from President and Vice-Chancellor Rhonda L. Lenton, and Chair of the York University Alumni Board Francesca Accinelli (BFA ’92).

Tickets for this virtual event are complimentary, but registration is required. Secure a ticket and learn more about the recipients at yorku.ca/alumniandfriends/alumniawards.

STS Seminar Series returns with an exploration of infrastructure and ghost rivers in the urban landscape

STS Seminar Series Sept. 14 FEATURED

The the first talk of the 2021-22 Science and Technology Studies (STS) Research Seminar Series takes place on Tuesday, Sept. 14 from 12:30 to 2 p.m. and features Kregg Hetherington, associate professor of anthropology at Concordia University. Hetherington’s talk is titled “Infrastructure and Ghost Rivers: Making Kin in the Urban Anthropocene.”

Kregg Hetherington

In November of this year, the city of Montreal will begin working to cover up a 200-metre creek, the last significant natural water flow within its boundaries. A group of local activists have been fighting the creek’s burial in court for years, but the city won its argument that after years of neglect, and some shenanigans in local plumbing infrastructure, the creek’s smell has become unbearable and it must go the way of all urban rivers before it – into a concrete pipe. As activists fought this, they underwent a kind of infrastructural inversion, becoming aware not only of submerged infrastructure but also the environmental, legal and historical underpinnings of urban plumbing. In so doing, they unearthed a ghost: a long-lost tributary of the St. Laurence River known as the Saint Pierre River. Following their experience and that of other ghost hunters, this talk will reflect on how entities inhabit the urban landscape, and the role that such entities might have in an Anthropocenic reimagining of urban life.

Now in its 28th year, the STS Research Seminar Series features seminars on a wide range of STS-related topics. Sponsored by the Department of Science and Technology Studies and co-ordinated by its members, the series has hosted over 500 speakers from Canada and around the world. All events in the series are free and open to the public, with no registration required.

All events in the series will run on Tuesdays from 12:30 to 2 p.m. They will be delivered via Zoom in the fall term, with the winter term to be determined. To receive a Zoom link for this event and others in the series, contact Conor Douglas, seminar series coordinator, at cd512@yorku.ca.