York researchers awarded prestigious Banting Fellowships

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Two researchers have recently been awarded prestigious Banting Fellowships. 

Van-Veeren-100x125Elspeth Van Veeren (left) received her PhD in International Relations at the University of Bristol in 2011. Before joining York, she was a UK Economic and Social Research Council Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of International Relations at the University of Sussex (2011-2012) and a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Centre for Advanced Security Theory at the University of Copenhagen (2013).  The Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship has been awarded to pursue her research program at York’s Centre for International and Security Studies. 

Her project, "The Invisible Security Project", seeks to understand how invisibility has evolved as a security concept, tactic and a technology and how invisible technologies become part of the construction of security discourses. This research will focus on the extent to which technologies that rely on different modes of invisibility transform security practices – along with public understanding of security -- and therefore the ethics and laws of war. Van Veeren will be mentored by Professor Robert Latham, in the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies.

emilyEmily Flynn-Jones (right), who received her PhD in New Media Cultures at the University of Wales Newport in 2012, has been awarded a Banting Postdoctoral fellowship to pursue her research program.  She will be mentored by Professor Jennifer Jenson, in the Faculty of Education.

Her project titled, "Gender Work at Play: A Study Examining the Intersections of Work, Play and Gender in Games", will explore the intersection of connected issues that make videogames a non-inclusive culture.  The project will focus on the intersection of work, play and gender in game culture by conducting research with employers and employees regarding the female experience working in a heavily gendered environment and industry.  It will also examine the potential for feminist intervention and affirmative action through the medium of games by looking at specific makers as well as ways of making that more inclusive as well as philosophies for the design of games that are explicitly feminist.

The awards were announced by Greg Rickford, minister of state (science & technology). Both researchers will receive $140,000 in research funding over two years.

 “The Banting Fellowship provides these outstanding researchers with the resources and support to continue building their innovative research programs.  We are most pleased to have Drs. Van Veeren and Flynn-Jones pursue their research at York,” said Robert Haché, York’s vice-president research & innovation. 

The purpose of the Banting Postdoctoral Fellowships is to build world-class research capacity by recruiting top-tier Canadian and international postdoctoral researchers at an internationally competitive level of funding. Seventy fellowships are awarded yearly through the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Natural Sciences & Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Social Sciences & Humanities Research Council of Canada.

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