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21.01.2014 in Top Stories Bookmark and Share

York student wins prestigious Lincoln M. Alexander award for community-building

Noise for Social Change mentor Talisha Ramsaroop, a fourth-year Social Work student in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, is presented with the Lincoln M. Alexander Award for her work as a mentor for students

Noise for Social Change mentor Talisha Ramsaroop, a fourth-year Social Work student in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, is presented with the Lincoln M. Alexander Award for her work as a mentor for students battling racial stereotypes in Toronto’s urban core. From left: MPP Don Valley East Michael Coteau, Talisha Ramsaroop and David Onley, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario

Talisha Ramsaroop, a fourth-year Sociology student in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, has won the prestigious Lincoln M. Alexander Award for her work as a mentor for students battling racial stereotypes in Toronto’s urban core. Ramsaroop was presented with her certificate and award for the community category by the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, David Onley, at an awards presentation at Queen’s Park yesterday.

Ramsaroop earned the community award for her ongoing work to provide a voice to urban youth in Toronto who are struggling to overcome the barriers put in their way by racial discrimination. By playing a key role in NOISE for Social Change, an initiative funded by York University’s Academic Innovation Fund that saw LA&PS Social Work students working youth from the Jane and Finch community to develop solutions to social issues. Ramsaroop mentors urban youth to break down the barriers caused by racial stereotypes, complete high school, and look ahead to post-secondary education opportunities.

Ramsaroop is responsible for student engagement with 40 youth that are part of NOISE for Social Change. She took the initiative to create job-posting boards, spread the word about scholarships, and write youth-friendly blogs to encourage engagement and participation in as many opportunities as possible.

“[These] award recipients demonstrate that sustained leadership is important to eliminating discrimination,” said Onley, who recognized three Ontario residents with the Lincoln M. Alexander Award for their sustained leadership in eliminating racial discrimination.

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